GETTING ENGAGED? Fun facts you might just want to know

May 1, 2014

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Getting Engaged?   Fun facts you might just want to know

 Did you know:

  1.  The tradition of an engagement ring was introduced in 1477. Archduke Maximillian of Austria gave Mary of Burgundy a Gold ring set with a diamond as a token of love. 
  2. Ancient cultures believed that the third finger on the left hand, had a special vein called Vena Amoris, the vein of “love,” this vein runs directly to the heart. 
  3. The word diamond comes from the Greek word “adamant” which means steadfast or invincible. It is from this word that the diamond gets its name. Diamonds are believed to be indestructible but although a very hard material they are also quite brittle so getting a hammer to it will not do it much good!!
  4. Some engagement rings are used as Wedding bands. You can still have a separate wedding ring band, but some designs incorporate this.
  5. Countries such as England, United states, France, and Canada traditionally wear the engagement ring on the left hand. Where as Germany, Russia and India wear the ring on the right hand. 
  6. Although Valentines day is one of the most important days of the year for jewellery retailers, December is in fact the most popular time of the year to get engaged.
  7. Diamonds were not used on wedding bands or engagement rings until the 15th century
  8. The most expensive diamond engagement ring in the world is the De Beers Platinum. Weighing in at a cool 9-carats. It’s no wonder it costs around £1.2 million.
  9. The average diamond carat weight used in engagement rings is estimated at 0.37 carats.
  10. Did you know if you shine an ultraviolet light on a real diamond it will glow in the dark for a few seconds. Some experts believe this is a good way to make sure its the real thing.
  11. Never test a diamond by scratching a glass surface it will damage the surface of the Diamond.  Even a imitation glass diamond will scratch the surface of glass.